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Representatives from CNI member organizations gather twice annually to explore new technologies, content, and applications; to further collaboration; to analyze technology policy issues; and to catalyze the development and deployment of new projects. Each member organization may send two representatives. Visit https://www.cni.org/mm/spring-2017 for more information.
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Sunday, April 2
 

3:00pm

 
Monday, April 3
 

8:30am

11:00am

Registration Opens
Monday April 3, 2017 11:00am - 6:00pm
Pavilion Landing

11:30am

Orientation for First-Time Attendees
Speakers
avatar for Clifford Lynch

Clifford Lynch

Executive Director, Coalition for Networked Information
Clifford Lynch has led the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) since 1997. Prior to joining CNI, Lynch spent 18 years at the University of California Office of the President, the last 10 as Director of Library Automation. Lynch, who holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley, is an adjunct professor at Berkeley’s School of Information. He is both a past president and recipient of the Award of Merit... Read More →


Monday April 3, 2017 11:30am - 12:15pm
Enchantment C-D

12:15pm

Break
Monday April 3, 2017 12:15pm - 1:15pm
Pavilion Court

1:15pm

Opening Plenary: What Today's Students Have Taught Us

Project Information Literacy (PIL) is a series of national research studies that investigates what it is like to be a student in the digital age. Since 2008, we have surveyed and interviewed more than 13,000 college students and recent graduates from over 60 U.S. higher education institutions, making PIL the largest study of information literacy ever conducted. We seek to understand how students find information and conduct research — in their words and through their experiences — for coursework and solving information problems in their everyday lives. In this plenary talk, PIL’s information-seeking model is introduced and key research takeaways are presented from PIL’s different studies. Also included are examples from PIL’s work about how academic librarians throughout the country are developing ways for strengthening and supporting undergraduate research and ultimately, for helping students to succeed at learning.

http://projectinfolit.org/


Speakers
avatar for Alison Head

Alison Head

Founder, Director, Project Information Literacy (PIL)
Alison J. Head is an information scientist and social science researcher. She is the founder and director of Project Information Literacy (PIL), an ongoing, research study research study that asks: What it is like to be a student in the digital age? In a series of nine groundbreaking research studies, PIL has investigated how college students and recent graduates utilize research skills, competencies, and strategies for completing course work... Read More →


Monday April 3, 2017 1:15pm - 2:30pm
Pavilion I-III

2:30pm

Break
Monday April 3, 2017 2:30pm - 2:45pm
TBA

2:45pm

A Linked Data Approach for Humanities Data
The Archaeology of Reading (AOR) aims to enable innovative and systematic research of historical reading practices through the creation of a digital research environment that contains two select corpora of books annotated by Gabriel Harvey and John Dee. Through the annotation and physical manipulation of their books, both readers created a web of relationships between annotations and between (constituent parts of) these books. In addition to these compelling humanities dimensions, AOR informs the development of an extensible data infrastructure that supports a range of data and services. At the 2016 Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) spring membership meeting, the AOR team discussed the novel methods by which scholars, librarians and technologists have worked as equal partners to develop this infrastructure. At the 2016 CNI fall membership meeting, the AOR team demonstrated the use of common infrastructure to support multiple data models related to digitized content from manuscripts and early printed books. For this presentation, the AOR team will explain the use of linked data models and protocols to connect the various data and to study the scholars' and annotators' pathways through both physical and digital content. Our approach supports the breadth of diverse humanities data without sacrificing the inherent richness from the underlying different data models. This systematic progression of supporting increasingly complex scholarly use cases and of extending the technological capabilities represents an important exemplar for levering extensible, common infrastructure across a diverse range of humanities data.

http://bookwheel.org
http://romandelarose.org 

Speakers
avatar for Sayeed Choudhury

Sayeed Choudhury

Associate Dean for Research Data Management, Johns Hopkins University
JG

Jaap Geraerts

Research Associate, Centre for Editing Lives and Letters, University College London


Monday April 3, 2017 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Enchantment A-B

2:45pm

Direct from the Swamp: Developments of the 45th President and 115th Congress
D.C. policy analysts provide a quick overview of policy and organizational developments in the Trump Administration and 115th Congress. Then they will transition to a deeper exploration of selected issues of particular interest to the community. The specific issues will depend on developments up to the time of the Coalition for Networked Information membership meeting, but may well include copyright, net neutrality, federal funding, data refuge/access to government information, immigration, and privacy. The conclusion will include ARL and ALA policy initiatives and plans, leading into the Q&A period.

Speakers
KL

Krista L. Cox

Director of Public Policy Initiatives, Association of Research Libraries
AS

Alan S. Inouye

Director of Public Policy, American Library Association


Monday April 3, 2017 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Sendero

2:45pm

DSpace 7: Selecting and Building a New DSpace User Interface
In 2015, the DSpace Steering Group announced an initiative to prototype and select the technology to use for a new, modern user interface (UI), targeted for DSpace 7. Later that same year, a DSpace UI Prototype Challenge was announced, encouraging institutions and community members to rapidly build small UI prototypes on various technology platforms. In early 2016, the community prototypes were closely analyzed, and a developer team was tasked with building a proof-of-concept on the leading platform, Angular 2. At the 2016 Open Repositories conference, the proof-of-concept UI was presented along with an analysis of findings. We discovered that the Angular 2 proof-of-concept UI provided a more modern, dynamic user experience, while also meeting DSpace's requirements for search engine optimization (SEO) and accessibility. As of late 2016, we established a new DSpace 7 UI Working Group to begin building the new Angular UI for DSpace 7. This working group quickly established two subgroups: a team concentrating on Angular 2 UI development and a team concentrating on necessary REST API enhancements. This briefing will provide information about the project's goals, progress, and lessons learned. Acknowledgement: Tim Donohue, Technical Lead for DSpace, DuraSpace

DSpace UI Prototype Challenge: https://wiki.duraspace.org/display/DSPACE/DSpace+UI+Prototype+Challenge
DSpace 7 UI Working Group: https://wiki.duraspace.org/display/DSPACE/DSpace+7+UI+Working+Group
CALL for Participation in DSpace 7 Development: http://duraspace.org/node/3075 

Speakers
DH

Debra Hanken Kurtz

CEO, DuraSpace, DuraSpace
avatar for Michele Mennielli

Michele Mennielli

International Business Developer, 4Science
avatar for Maureen Walsh

Maureen Walsh

Interim Head, Publishing and Repository Services, Libraries, The Ohio State University


Monday April 3, 2017 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Enchantment F

2:45pm

How Libraries Learn: Catalyzing Student Research with the Fondren Fellows Program
As universities strive to create opportunities for students to engage in meaningful research projects, the library can serve as not only the source of research materials, but also the subject of research. Through the Fondren Fellows program, created in 2016, Rice University undergraduates and graduate students work on projects related to a research question around improving and extending Fondren Library’s programs and services. Fellows are mentored by a library staff member, present their results to relevant stakeholders inside and outside the library, and receive up to $3000 for one semester of work. This presentation will provide an overview of the Fondren Fellows program and present case studies of two Fellows’ projects: Know Your (Author) Rights and Mapping Civil War Narratives. For the former project, an anthropology graduate student conducted interviews with faculty across Rice’s seven tenure-granting Schools to better understand how they approach the issue of rights retention in connection with their published work. For the latter project, a history graduate student used Esri ArcGIS and Story Maps to visualize the library’s Civil War–era archival collections. Both projects allowed these students to gain critical professional skills, while creating new points of access for library materials and laying the groundwork for expanded scholarly communication services. More broadly, the Fellows program has allowed Fondren Library to tap into new sources of expertise and energy as it promotes an organizational culture of research-based practice.

http://library.rice.edu/fondren-fellows http://ricegis.maps.arcgis.com/apps/Cascade/index.html?appid=b3b82f0369994442b3a6fa86c0ff5a20

Speakers
ML

Marcel LaFlamme

Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Anthropology, Rice University
CR

Christina Regelski

Ph.D. student, Department of History, Rice University
LS

Lisa Spiro

Executive Director, Digital Scholarship Services, Fondren Library, Rice University
Rice University


Monday April 3, 2017 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Fiesta I-II

2:45pm

Is the Researcher Human? Is the Librarian? Bots, Conversational User Interfaces, and Virtual Research Assistants
Information seeking, retrieval, analysis, and resultant decision-making are often discussed as human activities; however, increasingly humans rely on automation, technology surrogates, and artificial intelligence for these activities. Bots and conversational user interfaces are beginning to emerge as service surrogates in libraries. Legal and sales professions are increasingly relying on virtual research assistants and technology assisted review and decision-making. As these trends grow and additional capacities emerge through machine learning and artificial intelligence, libraries and information providers will face emerging questions that will change practices while potentially expanding opportunities for services and contributing value to research, learning, and other information-intensive activities. This issue-oriented session will explore implications of these emerging technologies and their applications for libraries and information providers. Questions include: In what circumstances can bot deployment enhance services to users? How should we design content and interfaces when the "reader" of the content might not be a human, but rather a computer or bot that is processing that information on behalf of a person? How will information literacy programs help users develop fluency with conversational (and often voice-based) search and retrieval? What are the ethical and legal implications of deploying these technologies? How do we ensure accessibility for people with disabilities to these tools? After an initial discussion among the panelists, attendees will be encouraged to share their perspectives and raise additional questions in this issue-oriented session.

Speakers
JG

Jason Griffey

Affiliate Fellow, Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University
avatar for Lisa Hinchliffe

Lisa Hinchliffe

Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Emily King

Emily King

Digital Services Librarian, College of Southern Nevada
avatar for Michael Schofield

Michael Schofield

Partner, LibUX
Hi. I'm Michael :).


Monday April 3, 2017 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Enchantment C-D

2:45pm

Ithaka S+R US Library Survey 2016
How are library leaders making investments in the future of their organizations? What kinds of strategies are they pursuing in support of research, teaching, and learning? And what constraints do they recognize as limiting their ability to pursue these strategies? In fall 2016, Ithaka S+R surveyed academic library deans and directors across the US on these key topics and several others. With a response rate of 49%, the project offers a wide array of perspectives on the opportunities and challenges currently facing academic libraries and higher education more broadly.

Our analysis by Carnegie Classification and by years in office shows some of the different needs and perspectives that directors manifest at different institution types and at different stages in their tenure. Comparisons with previous cycles of the Ithaka S+R Library Survey demonstrate the evolving strategies that libraries are implementing in response to the changing landscape of higher education. Comparisons with the Ithaka S+R US Faculty Survey 2015 point to a number of differences between faculty members and library directors on key issues. The full report of findings, co-authored by Christine Wolff and Roger Schonfeld, will be made publicly available in April 2017 in conjunction with the CNI meeting. This session will be designed to generate a rich discussion on the implications of the survey findings and potential follow-on projects.

Speakers
avatar for Roger C. Schonfeld

Roger C. Schonfeld

Director, Library and Scholarly Communications, Ithaka S+R
Roger is program director at Ithaka S+R. There, he leads strategic consulting, surveys, and other research projects, designed for academic libraries, publishers, and scholarly societies. Recently, Roger has led the development of Ithaka S+R’s surveys for individual colleges and universities, to help them better serve the needs of their own faculty members and students. He has also led research and consulting projects on collections... Read More →


Monday April 3, 2017 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Pavilion I-III

2:45pm

Resource Access for the 21st Century, RA21 Update: Pilots Advance to Improve Authentication and Authorization for Content
Building on the report by the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) on the Authentication and Authorization Survey conducted in 2016, the STM Association and NISO have been convening conversations focused on how to improve the user experience and provide a more seamless access experience to patrons, while also providing greater control and analytics over network activity. Community conversations commencing with the CNI fall meeting shared potential alternatives to IP-authentication and sought to build momentum toward testing alternatives among publisher, system vendors, and library partners. This session will include information on several emerging pilots that will explore different approaches to key aspects, such as improving the "Where Are You From (WAYF)" user experience or defining user attributes to support more granular usage reporting while still preserving user privacy. Participants in these pilots include publishers, technology providers, corporate subscribers (e.g. pharmaceutical companies) and academic institutions.
The presentation will be followed by an interactive audience discussion of the opportunity, institutional readiness, and potential next steps.

http://www.stm-assoc.org/standards-technology/ra21-resource-access-21st-century/

Speakers
AG

Ann Gabriel

Vice President, Academic & Research Relations, Elsevier
avatar for Chris Shillum

Chris Shillum

Vice President Product Management, Platform and Data Integration, Elsevier
Chris Shillum is currently Vice President of Platform and Data Integration for Elsevier, where he is focusing on integrating data resources across silos to enable the next generation of personalized services for researchers and building out Elsevier’s big data platform. Previously, he was responsible for the platform and systems which power online products such as ScienceDirect and Scopus. He has worked in various capacities on Elsevier’s... Read More →


Monday April 3, 2017 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Enchantment E

2:45pm

The Emergence of Research Information Management (RIM) within US Libraries
Advancing technologies, standards, and networked information offer new opportunities for institutions to steward and disseminate the scholarly outputs of its researchers. In this project briefing we will discuss how research information management (RIM) is emerging as a part of scholarly communications practice in many US university libraries, in close collaboration with other campus stakeholders. RIM intersects many aspects of traditional library services in discovery, acquisition dissemination and analysis of scholarly activities, but does so at the convergence of institutional data systems, faculty/research processes, and institutional partners. It also can serve as the basis for a growing shift in emphasis in research libraries--from focusing primarily on providing local access to research produced elsewhere, toward a greater focus on providing global access to research produced by the institution's community. The integration of open access repositories with RIM programs provides an opportunity to strengthen participation with and impact of both. The University of Arizona, with leadership from the University Libraries, has converted a decentralized, antiquated paper-based faculty activity review (FAR) process into a cloud-based system, integrating faculty inputs and aggregating information from multiple data systems creating a complete authoritative record of faculty activities and outputs to support institutional analysis and expert discovery services. Duke University libraries support a faculty-initiated open access policy by simplifying processes for self-archiving and aggregating research outputs into public profiles to support both individual researchers' incentives and institutional needs. This presentation will also outline a growing program of research on emerging library support for RIM, led by OCLC Research in collaboration with OCLC Research Library Partnership member institutions.

http://uavitae.arizona.edu/
http://profiles.arizona.edu
https://scholars.duke.edu/
https://scholarworks.duke.edu/
http://hangingtogether.org/?p=5794

Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Bryant

Rebecca Bryant

Senior Program Officer, OCLC Research
Rebecca Bryant, PhD, serves as Senior Program Officer at OCLC Research where she leads and develops areas for the OCLC Research Library Partnership (ORLP) and for OCLC Research related to research information management (RIM) and research data management support services. | | Current research projects include the development of a survey of RIM adoption practices worldwide, in collaboration with EuroCRIS. In addition, she is working with... Read More →
avatar for Paolo Mangiafico

Paolo Mangiafico

Coordinator of Scholarly Communications Technology, Duke University
Paolo Mangiafico serves as Coordinator of Scholarly Communication Technologies at Duke University Libraries, and as director of the Mellon-funded Scholarly Communication Institute (trianglesci.org). In a former role as Director of Digital Information Strategy in the Office of the Provost at Duke, he co-chaired the Provost-appointed Digital Futures Task Force, which developed an open access policy for Duke faculty scholarship (adopted by the Duke... Read More →
avatar for Maliaca Oxnam

Maliaca Oxnam

Associate Librarian, Office of Digital Innovation & Stewardship, University of Arizona


Monday April 3, 2017 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Fiesta III-IV

4:15pm

Building Data Refuge: From Bucket Brigade to Sustainable Action
Beginning late in 2016, a large collaborative group of volunteers began to work together to back up vulnerable climate and environmental data at events around the country. In this panel, key organizers of this endeavor will discuss the Data Rescue events, the workflow that was developed to support these distributed activities, and some of the challenges encountered. They will also describe the emerging collaborative effort to move towards a more sustainable model, bringing together public participation, research libraries, and the open data community. To be successful, such a model will need to draw on the long-standing commitment from the library community to support digital preservation and access to federal data, as well as on more recent partnerships that we are forming with members of the open data movement in response to the urgency of the current situation and the myriad challenges of preserving access to these complex sources.

http://www.ppehlab.org/
http://librariesnetwork.org

Speakers
avatar for Laurie Allen

Laurie Allen

Assistant Director for Digital Scholarship, Libraries, University of Pennsylvania
University of Pennsylvania
avatar for Kim Eke

Kim Eke

Director for Teaching, Research & Learning Services, Libraries, University of Pennsylvania
At Penn Libraries, Kim is charged with planning, coordinating, and assessing new services, establishing new programs, and driving cutting-edge initiatives that directly impact the teaching and learning continuum at Penn. She provides oversight for the campus learning management system (Canvas), digital scholarship and instruction services, two technology-rich information commons spaces, media editing and production studios, library teaching... Read More →
EF

Elizabeth Foster

Public Policy and Social Sciences Librarian, Georgetown University
avatar for Delphine Khanna

Delphine Khanna

Head of Digital Library Initiatives, Temple University
avatar for Catherine Morse

Catherine Morse

Government Information, Law and Political Science Librarian, University of Michigan


Monday April 3, 2017 4:15pm - 5:15pm
Pavilion I-III

4:15pm

From Theory to Practice: Leading the Way with Learning Data Principles
Learning data is being generated at an exponential rate by students, faculty, and staff. This presents unprecedented opportunities to influence student academic success and learning behavior, assist support staff with the planning of individual or group academic interventions, inform pedagogies and curriculum offerings, and effectively address recruitment, retention, marketing, and institutional effectiveness. While there are challenges in harnessing, governing, and using learning data, along with clarifying why it is collected, colleges and universities have an opportunity to collaborate and provide their collective guidance on decisions that need to be made. This is why several members of IMS Global Learning Consortium came together to outline guiding principles for institutional leaders, administrators, and other stakeholders, who are participating in ongoing dialogues specific to the gathering and usage of data. As part of an evolving playbook of resources being developed by IMS Global institutional members, this draft is designed to help academic leaders, IT directors, and practitioners reflect upon, discuss, and shape institutional and global discussions around learning data. This resource document is open for public review and comment. Led by institutional representatives who were instrumental in the articulation of these principles, this session will be an open discussion and debate about the principles and the rationale behind them. We will also explore the collaborative process used to develop these principles to inspire others to get involved and contribute to these types of collaborative efforts and share examples of other efforts in this area.

https://www.imsglobal.org/learning-data-analytics-key-principles 

Speakers
avatar for Jenn Stringer

Jenn Stringer

Associate CIO, Academic Engagement, University of California at Berkeley
Responsible for the strategic direction of academic computing at UC Berkeley and for services that support classroom technologies and video capture and production, faculty instructional technology support, the campus LMS and student portal, and student computing.


Monday April 3, 2017 4:15pm - 5:15pm
Enchantment C-D

4:15pm

From Transactions to Collaborations: The Greenhouse Studios, Scholarly Design at UConn Library
While collaborative multi-modal presentations of scholarly output have become more common, much of the routine operations of scholarship remain anchored in print-centric regimens. Scholars - particularly in the humanities - continue to work within the familiar hierarchical and single author print tradition. In this model librarians are essential to the process; however, they are involved in the pre-work and not the development of the final product. One of the aims of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation funded Greenhouse Studios at the University of Connecticut (UConn) is to draw together faculty and librarian staff, along with other non-academic staff to flatten the vestiges of a print-only tradition. It will do so by implementing and honing a design-based, inquiry-driven, collaboration-first model of scholarly production based on continuous, close, equitable communication among equal partners. There are specific questions the library in particular is seeking answers to in this inquiry. For example, librarians may participate in creating these scholarly products because of skills and knowledge not related to their library degree. How can we set up library staff for success in this environment? Are our current librarians equipped, both in training and organizationally, for a non-transactional relationship with faculty and other staff? How do we evaluate their contribution and feeling of integration, authorship, etc.? This project briefing will focus on the UConn Library's motivations, expectations, and early impressions of the roles, benefits, and administrative barriers and as we begin this three year collaboration with a diverse set of UConn partners.

Speakers
MB

Martha Bedard

Vice Provost University Library, University of Connecticut
avatar for Greg Colati

Greg Colati

Assistant University Librarian, Archives, Special Collections, & Digital Curation, University of Connecticut
Digital Libraries, Digital repositories, Scholarly Communications Design.
HP

Holly Phillips

Assistant Vice Provost University Library, University of Connecticut


Monday April 3, 2017 4:15pm - 5:15pm
Enchantment E

4:15pm

Institutional Analytics Dashboards with SHARE: The UC San Diego Experience
Like many universities, the University of California San Diego (UCSD) Library wanted to build a research data catalog to provide discoverability and access to data sets created or hosted on campus, but not housed in the Library's own repository. They were going to (1) find and curate these datasets; (2) build a database to host the metadata about these datasets; (3) expose the database to the web via API; and (4) create a front-end dashboard atop said API. Enter SHARE. SHARE is creating a free, open data set of research activity across the research life cycle, data sets included, and a set of tools to access this data, including an API. With a dataset of over 17.8 million entries, a database, and a flexible API, the SHARE team has built several interfaces as simple, client-side front-ends. Thus, rather than having to complete the four steps previously mentioned, UCSD Library staff had only to do the first step and contribute metadata to the SHARE data set. UCSD's partner, the Center for Open Science, created a modular and themeable open source front-end to the API, database, and data already provided by SHARE. Other organizations can easily adapt this open source code to create their own dashboards. This presentation will include a demonstration of the dashboard, a description of the process, and discussion of challenges and tips for other institutions that want to do something similar.

https://share.osf.io/discover
https://osf.io/preprints/discover

Speakers
avatar for Declan Fleming

Declan Fleming

Chief Technology Strategist, University of California San Diego
avatar for Jeffrey Spies

Jeffrey Spies

Chief Technology Officer, Center for Open Science
Jeffrey Spies is the co-founder and Chief Technology Officer of the Center for Open Science (COS; http://cos.io), a non-profit technology company missioned to increase openness, integrity, and reproducibility of scientific research. Jeff is also the co-lead of SHARE (http://share-research.org)--an initiative by the Association of Research Libraries, the Association of American Universities, the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities... Read More →


Monday April 3, 2017 4:15pm - 5:15pm
Fiesta I-II

4:15pm

Libraries as Open Global Platform: An MIT Vision and Invitation
The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) released an Institute-wide Task Force on the Future of Libraries Preliminary Report on October 24, 2016. The overarching theme of the report is that the MIT Libraries must become a global library for a global university. In our vision of the future, libraries operate as open, trusted, durable, interdisciplinary, interoperable content platforms that provide a foundation for the entire life cycle of information for collaborative global research and education. The MIT Task Force envisions research libraries as a networked set of global platforms replete with content, data, metadata, images, audio files, laboratory notebooks, course materials, and more. We imagine a repository of knowledge and data that can be exploited and analyzed by humans, machines, and algorithms. Fully realizing this vision will require collaboration among libraries, archives, publishers and a variety of other players in the scholarly communications sector. The goal of this presentation is to inspire productive discussions on how our communities might collaboratively contribute to building the tools, models, infrastructures and connections to drive progress towards this vision for the global academic library community.

pubpub.org/pub/future-of-libraries

Speakers
avatar for Chris Bourg

Chris Bourg

Director of Libraries, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Chris Bourg is the Director of Libraries at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where she also has oversight of the MIT Press. Prior to assuming her role at MIT, Chris worked for 12 years in the Stanford University Libraries, most recently as the Associate University Librarian for Public Services. | | Chris is keenly interested in issues of diversity and inclusion in higher education, and in the role libraries play in advancing social... Read More →
AD

Armand Doucette

Associate Director Information Technology and Digital Development, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
HY

Heather Yager

Director of Digital Development, Massachusetts Institute of Technology


Monday April 3, 2017 4:15pm - 5:15pm
Sendero

4:15pm

The So-What Test: How and Why Schools Are Embedding the IR into Campus Culture
Since the creation of institutional repositories in the early 2000s, users have debated both their role and their success, or lack thereof. How do the primary goals of a repository affect its sustainability and relevance on campus? Drawing from a diverse community of over 500 institutions, we find that schools with thriving institutional repository programs tend to be the ones that eschew disrupting the academic publishing model and instead prioritize existing institutional goals. Rather than persuade campus groups to come to them, these libraries proactively build their repository services around the campus's most pressing needs. In this project briefing, we discuss what it means to integrate the institutional repository into the core goals and activities of an institution. We present possible frameworks for assessing the level of campus-wide adoption, from technical measurements like linking, embedding, and uploading to nontechnical expressions of support, including funding. We share our findings about the types of repository content that universities value most. Finally, we will discuss how this research has inspired bepress's development direction toward more flexible and seamless embedding of researcher profiles, custom expertise directories, and readership and impact analytics. Attendees will come away with concrete ideas for how to engage various campus groups in ways that lead to sustainable, university-wide programs far beyond the scope of the traditional institutional repository.

Speakers
avatar for Promita Chatterji

Promita Chatterji

Product Team, bepress


Monday April 3, 2017 4:15pm - 5:15pm
Enchantment F

4:15pm

To the Rescue of the Orphans of Scholarly Communication
Over the past years, scholars have started using a wide variety of online portals to conduct aspects of their research and to convey research results. These portals exist outside of the established scholarly publishing system and can be dedicated to scholarly use, such as experiment.org, or general purpose, such as SlideShare. The combination of productivity features and global exposure offered by these portals attracts researchers and they happily deposit scholarly artifacts there. But history has shown that even popular web platforms can disappear without a trace. Also, they rarely provide any explicit archival guarantees; many times quite the opposite.  Whereas initiatives such as LOCKSS and Portico have emerged to make sure that the output of the established scholarly publishing system gets archived, no comparable efforts exist for scholarly artifacts deposited in these online platforms. A recently started Andrew W. Mellon funded project, explores how these scholarly orphans could be archived. Because of the scale of the problem - the number of platforms and artifacts involved - the project starts from a web-centric archival paradigm inspired by web archiving. Because the artifacts are often times created by researchers affiliated with an institution, the project focuses on tools for institutions to identify and archive these artifacts. This project briefing will introduce the problem domain. It will provide an insight into the approach that is explored for discovering artifacts that were deposited in portals, capturing them, and ingesting them into an institutional archive. The wide range of research challenges involved in conducting these tasks will be detailed and early results will be shared.

Speakers
avatar for Martin Klein

Martin Klein

Scientist, Los Alamos National Laboratory
ML

Michael L. Nelson

Professor, Old Dominion University
HV

Herbert Van de Sompel

Scientist, Los Alamos National Laboratory
Herbert Van de Sompel graduated in Mathematics and Computer Science at Ghent University (Belgium), and in 2000 obtained a Ph.D. in Communication Science there. For many years, he headed Library Automation at Ghent University. After leaving Ghent in 2000, he was Visiting Professor in Computer Science at Cornell University, and Director of e-Strategy and Programmes at the British Library. | Currently, he is the team leader of the Prototyping... Read More →


Monday April 3, 2017 4:15pm - 5:15pm
Enchantment A-B

4:15pm

Understanding Usage, Impact, and Pitfalls in Research Data Analytics
"Polluted Leftovers: Repository Metrics from the Perspective of a Most Downloaded Item" (Wheeler, Arlitsch)


Over- and under-reporting of item downloads within institutional repositories (IR) are known issues which largely derive from inconsistent measurement of bot activity. The challenges of identifying and filtering the activity of "bad" versus "good" bots can fall outside the interest and scope of duties for repository managers, while the abundance of metrics applications and configurations among common IR platforms can contribute to rather than alleviate existing complexities. In this project briefing, librarians from Montana State University and the University of New Mexico (UNM) present a mapping of DSpace Solr log to Google Analytics data together with the outcomes of the resulting analysis. By telling the discovery and access "stories" of the most downloaded items from UNM's IR, LoboVault, presenters will characterize human and bot behaviors which illustrate the reporting challenges facing repository managers and the contrasts between metrics services.

"Making Data Count: Promoting Open Data Through Usage and Impact Tracking" (Abrams)



Research data are fundamental to the success of the academic enterprise. However, the primary vehicle for scholarly credit and accountability remains the journal article, and the academic community still gauges the impact of scholarship primarily through article citation and usage statistics. How can we expand this to include research data? The challenge in doing so is that the complex, aggregative, and often dynamic nature and use of datasets is quite different from that of publications. Any solution will require the development of new modes for tracking impact through data-level metrics (DLM). The widespread availability of such measures would constitute an important incentive for promoting open data principles and encouraging adoption of research data management best practices. Our project, Making Data Count (MDC), aims to do just that: to build the necessary social and technical infrastructure to support data as first class research outputs. The MDC team (including the California Digital Library, COUNTER, DataCite, and DataONE) are working together to publish a new COUNTER recommendation on data usage statistics; launch a DataCite-hosted MDC service for aggregated DLM based on the open-source Lagotto platform; and to build tools for data repository and discovery services to easily integrate with the new MDC service. This effort will provide a clear path for data outputs to be given better recognition and fuller integration into the scholarly ecosystem and workflows.

https://dlm.datacite.org/

Speakers
SA

Stephen Abrams

Associate Director, UC Curation Center, California Digital Library
avatar for Kenning Arlitsch

Kenning Arlitsch

Dean of the Library, Montana State University
JW

Jonathan Wheeler

Data Curation Librarian, University of New Mexico


Monday April 3, 2017 4:15pm - 5:15pm
Fiesta III-IV

5:30pm

'But We Don't Do Research Like That Anymore'
The title of this session, "But We Don't Do Research Like That Anymore," is a quotation from an associate dean (research) in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Calgary. His comment was elicited in the fall of 2015 in our discussion of the Library's principal means of supporting faculty research. Soon thereafter, we conducted a series of workshops sponsored by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to identify the new forms of support for multidisciplinary research needed by scholars in 15 different disciplines. We reported on our findings at the spring 2016 Coalition for Networked Information meeting. In this presentation, I will describe the next steps being taken to transform our research support environment based on new Library roles and relationships within the University. While driven by the impact of new technologies and research techniques, this model is about shared platforms, service constellations and partnerships, ranging from the performing arts to medicine, and incubating a suite of faculty-led projects, all serving to reposition libraries within the academic research enterprise.

Speakers
TH

Thomas Hickerson

Vice Provost and University Librarian, University of Calgary


Monday April 3, 2017 5:30pm - 6:00pm
Fiesta III-IV

5:30pm

10(+) years of Deep Blue at the University of Michigan
Deep Blue, the University of Michigan's institutional repository service, launched in 2006. It now provides access to over 100,000 articles, theses, and other scholarly works written by U-M authors. We have succeeded in many ways (some replicable, some not, perhaps) and have also failed to meet our goals in others (many of them typical). In 2016 we launched an additional service, Deep Blue Data, to better handle the data needs of the University. So, as we plan to merge the original and the data services version on the Hydra/Fedora platform, we would like to share our experience and metrics, learn about how other experts are managing and enhancing what they offer, and discuss their plans for the future.

deepblue.lib.umich.edu

Speakers
JO

Jim Ottaviani

Librarian and Repository Manager for Deep Blue, University of Michigan


Monday April 3, 2017 5:30pm - 6:00pm
Sendero

5:30pm

Bibliometrics and Research Impact at University of Waterloo: An Exciting Campus Partnership
In 2012, the Bibliometrics Working Group at the University of Waterloo, composed of the Library, the Office of Research, Institutional Analysis and Planning (IAP) and faculty representatives, began its work. In 2015, a new campus position was created, Bibliometrics and Research Impact Librarian, and the white paper "Measuring Research Outputs through Bibliometrics" was released. This specialist librarian also supports the Ranking Working Group and the Research Impact Working Group and is responsible for bibliometrics education across campus for our students and faculty. This Librarian has also been working to create a North American community of practice for bibliometrics work. This project briefing will highlight this campus partnership, lessons learned so far, and questions for future directions and infrastructure requirements for support. Additionally, we will explore possible connections between bibliometrics work, citation analysis and evidence-based collection development practices for a research-intensive University.

Speakers
avatar for Annie Bélanger

Annie Bélanger

Associate University Librarian, Information Resources & Academic Excellence, University of Waterloo
Annie Bélanger is the Associate University Librarian, Information Resources & Academic Excellence, for the University of Waterloo. In this role, she provides executive leadership for collection lifecycle management as well as for information services, instruction, user engagement, accessibility and liaison services. Prior to this role, she held two Department Head positions; Head, Information Services & Resources at Waterloo and... Read More →
avatar for Alison Hitchens

Alison Hitchens

Acting Associate University Librarian, Research & Digital Discovery Services, University of Waterloo


Monday April 3, 2017 5:30pm - 6:00pm
Enchantment F

5:30pm

Data Integrity for Librarians, Archivists, and Criminals: What We Can Steal from Bitcoin, BitTorrent, and Usenet
Data integrity is important in distributed systems. The same characteristics that make these systems robust (e.g., fault tolerance) make maintaining data integrity challenging. For this reason, hash functions play a central role in the algorithms and technologies that power Usenet, BitTorrent, and Bitcoin and its blockchain. A hash function is a function that maps arbitrarily sized data to some ideally smaller, unique, and non-invertable data of fixed size (the importance of these attributes will be explained). The MD5 hash of the title of this presentation is 23c1d6085d85ae07378da9861e792c34; if the Oxford commas were removed, the hash would change to 6eed93a3b7dc829f38065518b346ee72. If you were given both the title and its hash, then you could compute the hash of the title you received yourself and compare it to that of the hash you received. If they differed, you would know that there was an error in transmission or that an intermediate editor rejects clarity and civility. This presentation will introduce hashes and their variants, these distributed and sometimes dubious systems, and what can be learned and practically applied in today's digital repositories for purposes of auditing, identifying, recovering, and sharing data.

Speakers
avatar for Jeffrey Spies

Jeffrey Spies

Chief Technology Officer, Center for Open Science
Jeffrey Spies is the co-founder and Chief Technology Officer of the Center for Open Science (COS; http://cos.io), a non-profit technology company missioned to increase openness, integrity, and reproducibility of scientific research. Jeff is also the co-lead of SHARE (http://share-research.org)--an initiative by the Association of Research Libraries, the Association of American Universities, the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities... Read More →


Monday April 3, 2017 5:30pm - 6:00pm
Pavilion I-III

5:30pm

Online Scientific Reference Sample Collections and Shared Linked Data for Heritage Science and Related Disciplines
The continued challenges for data in any discipline are sustainable access, open source file formats, and the capacity for linked data. Collaborations with European and American colleagues indicates a shared concern, with the need for a more integrated approach to truly linked data, and high level metadata embedded within datasets. Many related disciplines have begun to focus on the need to integrate and assess approaches from colleagues - from materials science to earth sciences, archeology, biology and chemistry. The Research Data Alliance (RDA) is bringing together a more cohesive approach to data management on the global scale. Developments for linked scientific data generated on heritage materials have advanced within the Library of Congress Preservation Research and Testing Division, who have engaged with colleagues in RDA and internationally to build upon existing standards and authorities, allowing greater credence for humanities and cultural heritage linked data. The Center for Linked Analytical Scientific Samples - Digital (CLASS-D) encompasses both a physical collection of reference samples and a database structure with the unique capability to link a range of types of scientific instrumental analyses back to original source materials, to track samples, and to improve web accessibility for heritage collections. Access and interoperability of data are critical elements for an open, federated database initiative. While there is lip service given to "open access," often the full requirements to achieve this are not fully understood until the completion of a project. Standardized digital protocols for storing and accessing scientific cultural heritage data are vital for interoperability between heritage institutions and the preservation of international culture in libraries, archives, galleries, and museums. The International Geo Sample Number Database (IGSN) uses an alphanumeric code to uniquely identify samples from the natural environment and can be integrated into DOI metadata to ensure linking between the physical objects and the data generated by their study. This is an excellent example of assuring data re-use and reproducibility and authentication of research results, a critical component of all research, and has been embraced by publishers. Linking and authenticating data for publication as well as ensuring these infrastructures are more freely accessible are essential components for linked networked data.
 Collaborators: Dr. Robert J. Hanisch, Director of the Office of Data and Informatics (ODI), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Dr. Kerstin Lehnert, Director, Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University

https://rd-alliance.org
http://www.geosamples.org/igsnabout http://www.loc.gov/preservation/scientists/projects/class.html

Speakers
FF

Fenella France

Chief, Preservation Research, Library of Congress


Monday April 3, 2017 5:30pm - 6:00pm
Enchantment C-D

5:30pm

Power of Partnership and the Affordable Learning Exchange
Affordability is a core value of The Ohio State University and the Affordable Learning Exchange (ALX). Living by that value transforms individuals and the work they do through relationship building and partnership development. ALX is comprised of the Office of Distance Education and eLearning (ODEE), University Libraries (OSUL), the University Center for the Advancement of Teaching (UCAT) and Undergraduate Student Government (USG). We are two years old and just welcomed the second cohort of faculty grant recipients resulting in savings to students of nearly $1 million by the end of 2017, and that is not the most exciting part of our work. The transformations happening in the classroom and to the organization through the deep partnerships developed among the ALX members are truly amazing. This presentation will discuss a few of the faculty grant projects, review how the initiative is being assessed, highlight key factors in the relationship building, and discuss the impact those relationships are having on the organization.

https://affordablelearning.osu.edu/

Speakers
avatar for Alison Armstrong

Alison Armstrong

Associate Director for Research and Education, The Ohio State University


Monday April 3, 2017 5:30pm - 6:00pm
Fiesta I-II

5:30pm

Updates from the Field: Image Viewing and Manipulation with Mirador
Our project briefing will present an in-progress project to publish a fully online spectral image dataset of medieval manuscripts with two layers of textual materials, i.e., palimpsests. Our mandate is to present a rich dataset with multiple axes for browsing images, and multiple image manipulation tools to facilitate online use. Currently, both the owning institution and the size of the dataset prevent dissemination of these assets via download. Therefore, the website had to meet the needs of very specialized scholars so that they could fully interact with images so that they could decipher illegible text, physical features, and possible relationships between folios. For our project we are using an IIIF-compliant image server and a modified branch of the Mirador viewer. In this presentation, we will review the functional requirements for the online interface, and the way we implemented the Mirador viewer to accomplish an initial proof of concept. We will discuss the key components of Mirador and IIIF that enabled our work as well as some of the challenges of working with rapidly evolving open source software.

http://www.sinaipalimpsests.org/

Speakers
avatar for Todd Grappone

Todd Grappone

Associate University Librarian for Digital Initiatives and Information Technology, University of California, Los Angeles
avatar for Elizabeth McAulay

Elizabeth McAulay

Interim Head, Digital Library Program, UCLA Library
McAulay has worked in the UCLA Digital Library Program for several years as the Librarian for Digital Collection Development and now serving as Interim Head. The UCLA Digital Library Program pursues and publishes digital projects that have international impact.


Monday April 3, 2017 5:30pm - 6:00pm
Enchantment E

5:30pm

Virtual Reality in the Trenches: Addressing the Preservation Challenges of Virtual Reality for Scholarship
This project briefing will present work being conducted at the University of Oklahoma (OU) to develop strategies and best practices for addressing the digital preservation and data curation needs associated with adopting the use of virtual reality (VR) and 3D digital assets in academic research and instruction. Since January 2016, OU Libraries has deployed eight networked VR workstations across campus, and since then, successful course integrations and research applications at OU - including architecture, structural biology, anthropology, and medical imaging - have demonstrated the capacity of VR to enhance spatial thinking, visual literacy and embodied information acquisition. Along with these new scholarly possibilities that VR offers, emerge new data management and digital preservation problems, including how to properly document and manage 3D research data throughout complex and iterative research practices, how to maintain chain of custody and document data precision, and how to sustain consistent access to VR technologies as they change over time. Addressing these concerns is critical to supporting reproducibility and integrity for research. This project briefing will draw from our real-world experiences of deploying VR in teaching and research to discuss these key issues related to the preservation of VR-related data, software and hardware. We will discuss current work focused on the development of infrastructure and best practices for archiving VR/3D research data on campus and beyond, exploring the following issues: sustainable 3D file formats; associated metadata (schemas and workflows); data repositories; and VR software and hardware preservation. The major takeaways from this presentation will include strategies for the development of “preservation-ready” academic VR platforms; identification of existing and future institutional collaborations; and preservation planning for 3D research outputs.

Speakers
avatar for Matt Cook

Matt Cook

Emerging Technologies Coordinator, University of Oklahoma
After earning his bachelor’s degree in philosophy from the University of Florida in Gainesville, Matt came to the University of Oklahoma where he earned a Master of Arts degree in Philosophy with a focus on cognition. His thesis was entitled: “Extended Perception: The Scope and Limits of Cognition” and was completed in May 2012. His areas of research include spatial cognition, tool use, entrepreneurship, and management. As one... Read More →
ZL

Zack Lischer-Katz

CLIR Research Fellow in Data Curation, University of Oklahoma


Monday April 3, 2017 5:30pm - 6:00pm
Enchantment A-B

6:00pm

Reception
Monday April 3, 2017 6:00pm - 7:15pm
Pavilion IV-VI
 
Tuesday, April 4
 

7:30am

Breakfast
Tuesday April 4, 2017 7:30am - 8:45am
Pavilion IV-VI

8:45am

Advancing Accessibility through Libraries
Chances are that your institution has a significant and growing number of accessible, digital course materials and they are not in a searchable collection in the library. Nearly every college or university is busy meeting accommodation requests from students with disabilities. Libraries can bring needed expertise and coordination to this work and contribute to student success for students with disabilities, a growing population that exceeds 10% of the student body. This panel will provide an update and discussion on three accessibility initiatives: an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) planning grant for repository services, the Association for Research Libraries (ARL) captioning initiative, and a pilot at the University of Illinois to contribute DAISY files to the HathiTrust Digital Library. The IMLS grant has studied the needs of Disability Resources & Services (DRS) staff and documented the needs and opportunities for libraries and DRS offices to work together, manage content nationally, and share accessible content to reduce duplication of effort. We will review lessons learned and outline steps forward. The ARL captioning initiative focuses on issues regarding mixed media and accessibility. It is currently researching issues regarding the tools, integration, interoperability, scope and infrastructure for different possibilities for developing shared or individual repositories of captioned files.

http://tischlibrary.tufts.edu/AccessibilityRepository
http://www.arl.org/news/arl-news/4176-joseph-d-combs-jr-appointed-arl-visiting-program-officer-for-accessibility

Speakers
JJ

Joseph (Jody) D. Combs

Visiting Program Officer for Accessibility, Association of Research Libraries (ARL), ARL/Vanderbilt University
avatar for Beth Namachchivaya

Beth Namachchivaya

Associate University Librarian for Research, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
LC

Laura C. Wood

Director of Tisch Library, Associate University Librarian for Research, Tufts University


Tuesday April 4, 2017 8:45am - 9:45am
Enchantment A-B

8:45am

Capacity Building for Digital Scholarship Services
"Building Capacity for Digital Humanities in the Library: A 'Learn by Doing' Approach" (Sanders)

Using the Claremont Colleges Library (CCL) as a case study, this presentation will offer ideas and suggestions about how to build capacity within the library and the broader campus community to support and advance digital humanities projects and digital scholarship, more broadly. The CCL has taken a “learn by doing” approach, offering a five-week short course in DH, encouraging library staff to work on their own digital humanities projects, and providing dedicated time for these exploratory endeavors. In the short course that launched the digital scholarship professional development series, participants examined a variety of digital research methods, including data visualization, spatial and temporal visualizations, network analysis, and topic modeling. Each week, this seminar-style course asked librarians and staff to consider how scholars in various fields might employ these approaches and how each method may be used within the context of librarianship. The professional development series will be presented, along with commentary about what has worked well so far and lessons learned. This presentation will be useful for administrators at institutions that already offer a suite of services to support digital scholarship. It will be especially applicable for those at institutions that are interested but unsure how to begin, particularly when there are few, if any, positions dedicated to digital scholarship.

"Experimenting with Digital Scholarship Service at the Chinese University of Hong Kong Library: Challenges and Future Directions" (Lam)

On March 17, 2016, the Chinese University of Hong Kong Library launched its first Digital Scholarship Lab at the Library as one of the key components of the Library's Digital Scholarship Service. Digital scholarship research is not very active at the University, and the Library sees a niche to offer support in this arena. The Lab is to provide a cutting-edge space for researchers in all disciplines to gather and immerse in digital scholarship research and other collaborative research work. It is also intended to create opportunities to engage faculty and researchers to foster collaborations in digital scholarship projects. A range of services is also offered to promote digital scholarship research; both research-related and teaching-related activities are held in the lab. After one year of operation, there have been both successes and challenges. This presentation will discuss how the library tackled the challenges encountered in building the lab, how the lab is equipped to facilitate flexibility and collaboration, the services offered, the journey to experiment different modes of operation (including staffing), the efforts made to engage scholars and researchers, the successes that have been achieved, and the lessons learned. Use cases and data will be presented to show how research support services and the roles of librarians in supporting digital scholarship research have been transformed.

Intro to Digital Humanities short course for librarians: http://dhatccl101.com
Digital Scholarship Workshop Materials: http://libguides.libraries.claremont.edu/digitalscholarship/ http://lib.cuhk.edu.hk/en/libraries/ul/dsl
http://lib.cuhk.edu.hk/en/research/digital-scholarship/space

Speakers
avatar for Louisa Lam

Louisa Lam

Head of Research Support & Digital Initiatives, The Chinese University of Hong Kong Library
avatar for Ashley  Sanders

Ashley Sanders

Director of the Claremont Colleges Digital Research Studio, Claremont University Consortium
In addition to serving as the Director of the Claremont Colleges Digital Research Studio, I am also a comparative colonial historian and a faculty member in History and Cultural Studies at Claremont Graduate University. I'm happy to talk about anything related to DH/Digital Scholarship - from program building to research and instruction. And, like most scholars you know, I'm always happy to chat about my research.


Tuesday April 4, 2017 8:45am - 9:45am
Fiesta III-IV

8:45am

Open Persistent Identifier Infrastructures: The Key to Scaling Mandate Auditing and Assessment Exercises
With the steady increase in research outputs, and the increasing number of active researchers from both academia and industry, research stakeholders find they need to be able to automate workflows in order to scale their systems efficiently. Funders want to be able to track the outputs that arise from research they have funded. As a result, institutions find themselves having to regularly analyze and summarize the research their faculty produce. Faculty, in turn, are facing increasing accounting bureaucracy in order to meet all the reporting requirements that are cascading through the system. And finally, publishers are seeking to make the manuscript submission and evaluation process more efficient as well as to increase the discoverability and richness of their publications. The key to scaling these activities is to take advantage of the open identifier and metadata infrastructures that have been developed by the industry. This talk will explore existing and emerging industry initiatives to develop open, robust, international and interdisciplinary identifier systems to help manage the increasing reporting requirements of the academia.

Speakers
avatar for Geoffrey  Bilder

Geoffrey Bilder

Director of Strategic Initiatives, Crossref
Geoffrey Bilder is Director of Strategic Initiatives at CrossRef, where he has led the technical development and launch of a number of industry initiatives including CrossCheck, CrossMark, ORCID and FundRef. He co-founded Brown University's Scholarly Technology Group in 1993, providing the Brown academic community with advanced technology consulting in support of their research, teaching and scholarly communication. He was subsequently head of IT... Read More →


Tuesday April 4, 2017 8:45am - 9:45am
Enchantment C-D

8:45am

Preserving Digital Content at Scale: Active Digital Preservation and Data/Metadata Migration
As institutions acquire and create more and more digital content it has become a problem to manage the workflow at an institutional level. Digital projects have been funded through different funding streams, stored in different places, and have metadata assigned in different ways creating confusion about how to prioritize and manage the preservation of this content. The focus of content stewardship is shifting from being application-centric to data-centric, with the understanding that content must move through time. In order to provide effective content stewardship and mechanisms to move repository data during content/data migrations and to preservation systems, significant efforts are needed for various import, export, verification, and management services.

This panel will present case studies in moving content through preservation activities with APTrust, the Digital Preservation Network, MetaArchive, and local applications through cases at the University of Wisconsin, Northwestern University, Pennsylvania State University, and recent work in the Fedora community. The presentations will highlight common methodologies, present new initiatives, and elicit group discussion on strategic and sustainable planning for active digital preservation.

https://wiki.duraspace.org/display/FF/Design+-+Import+-+Export
http://dpn.org/
http://aptrust.org/
http://metaarchive.org/

Speakers
avatar for Carolyn Caizzi

Carolyn Caizzi

Repository and Digital Curation, Northwestern University
avatar for Karen Estlund

Karen Estlund

Associate Dean for Technology and Digital Strategies, Pennsylvania State University
LK

Lee Konrad

Associate University Librarian for Technology Strategies and Data Services, University of Wisconsin
avatar for Mary Molinaro

Mary Molinaro

Executive Director, Digital Preservation Network
Digital Preservation Network
avatar for Nick Ruest

Nick Ruest

Digital Assets Librarian, York University


Tuesday April 4, 2017 8:45am - 9:45am
Fiesta I-II

8:45am

Rethinking Repositories
At many institutions, repository initiatives provide access, preservation and services for multiple programs - at-risk digital special collections, digitized materials, and the outputs of research, including publications and data. No single software stack, platform, service portfolio, or even library program can support all of these areas. Given this diffusion of stakeholders, needs, and processes, is there a unifying aspect for the institutional repository? If not, then what do we mean by "institutional repository?" In a time where both the needs of researchers and repository technologies are rapidly evolving, what strategies should libraries employ for developing technology, staffing, services, and policies to provide access and preservation for a wide range of institutional assets? In this panel discussion, repository leaders from the University of North Carolina and Duke University will start a conversation by describing their approaches, what they have learned, and how they think these services should evolve. They will pose some provocative questions for discussion with all attendees, and hope to stimulate a better understanding of cohesive approaches for repository programs.

Speakers
avatar for Jason Casden

Jason Casden

Head, Software Development, Library and Information Technology, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
avatar for Paolo Mangiafico

Paolo Mangiafico

Coordinator of Scholarly Communications Technology, Duke University
Paolo Mangiafico serves as Coordinator of Scholarly Communication Technologies at Duke University Libraries, and as director of the Mellon-funded Scholarly Communication Institute (trianglesci.org). In a former role as Director of Digital Information Strategy in the Office of the Provost at Duke, he co-chaired the Provost-appointed Digital Futures Task Force, which developed an open access policy for Duke faculty scholarship (adopted by the Duke... Read More →
avatar for Julie Rudder

Julie Rudder

Repository Program Librarian, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
avatar for Will Sexton

Will Sexton

Head, Digital Production Initiatives, Duke University


Tuesday April 4, 2017 8:45am - 9:45am
Pavilion I-III

8:45am

Update on FOLIO, OLE, and the Open Library Foundation
FOLIO is a community of librarians, designers, developers, service providers, and vendors working to develop an open source library services platform. FOLIO began in early 2016, and includes partners at EBSCO, Index Data, and the OLE Partnership. Over the last year, teams from these collaborators have worked towards the first code release in August of 2016, with continuous releases since. The OLE Partners have been active in FOLIO from the beginning and have restructured their effort to fully support FOLIO. OLE has worked with EBSCO and Index Data to set up community infrastructure for large scale and distributed design and development work. Part of that infrastructure is the Open Library Foundation, a new not-for-profit organization chartered to support open source community efforts. The Foundation seeks to enable, support and sustain efforts like FOLIO by creating an open forum for discussion about library management issues, and action to develop solutions. In this session, principals from the OLE Partners, Open Library Foundation, and FOLIO communities will provide updates and chart shared future directions. Learn about how open source communities restructure and evolve for innovation and inclusiveness. And learn how librarians, designers, software developers, and commercial vendors can collaborate to advance the scope of library technologies.

http://openlibraryenvironment.org
http://openlibraryfoundation.org
http://folio.org

Speakers
DC

David Carlson

Dean of University Libraries, Texas A&M University
SH

Sebastian Hammer

President, Index Data
avatar for Dean Krafft

Dean Krafft

Chief Technology Strategist, Cornell University
I'm working on a number of projects: ILS replacement, Linked Data for Libraries, VIVO, campus IT models, web archiving, Hydra, and IIIF, among others.


Tuesday April 4, 2017 8:45am - 9:45am
Enchantment E

8:45am

When Data Analytics and Big Data/Data Science Move to the Library
"When Data Analytics and Big Data/Data Science Move to the Library" (Boughida et al)



Why should librarians and info/data specialists care about data science? The interdisciplinary field of data science will be a significant and growing area of focus for our field, arguably redefining the future of librarianship and information science. It is rare for research libraries to acquire a data analytics program and serve as the umbrella entity for big data and data science at an academic institution. This panel will discuss how the University of Rhode Island (specifically libraries) was involved in acquiring the state's longitudinal and integrated data system Dataspark, and how the Big Data Collaborative that includes participation of students, staff and scholar educators from multiple colleges is going to be positioned within the library and beyond.

"Beyond Research Data Management: Emerging Trends in Library Support for Computational Research" (Dekker)

This briefing will explore how librarians are discovering opportunities to provide new forms of support to students and researchers engaged in computational research. Examples include librarians teaching and consulting on basic programming skills, data visualization, database management and reproducible research practices. I'll explore some possible explanations of this trend and how librarians can take advantage of emerging programs like Library Carpentry to develop proficiency and build communities of practice in these areas.

http://datasparkri.org/

Speakers
avatar for Karim Boughida

Karim Boughida

Dean of University Libraries, University of Rhode Island
avatar for Harrison Dekker

Harrison Dekker

Associate Professor and Data Services Librarian, University of Rhode Island
JP

Joan Peckham

Professor and Chair, Department of Computer Science and Statistics, University of Rhode Island
KP

Kimberly Pierson

Interim Director of DataSpark, University of Rhode Island


Tuesday April 4, 2017 8:45am - 9:45am
Enchantment F

9:45am

Break
Tuesday April 4, 2017 9:45am - 10:00am
Pavilion Court

10:00am

A CAVEkiosk in the Library: The At-Risk Cultural Heritage and the Digital Humanities UC Catalyst Grant
This session will provide a briefing on the At-Risk Cultural Heritage and the Digital Humanities University of California (UC), Catalyst grant work, specifically on the 3D CAVEkiosk installed in the University of California San Diego (UCSD) Geisel Library. The Cave is an interactive display for work which is being done at UCSD (Tom Levy) in collaboration with archaeology faculty at UC Berkeley (Benjamin Porter), UC Merced (Nicola Lercari) and UC Los Angeles (Willeke Wendrich), incorporating more than 10,000 years of cultural materials, architecture and landscapes. The grant includes site and artifact identification, cataloging, and digital preservation of complex data and other content derived from satellite imagery, drones, sensors, 3D data capture, and other techniques. The platform is expected to enable correlative studies of regional climate/environmental data and demographic, cultural, and technological changes, as well as the creation of 3D models using new kinds of geospatial data. It will also enable studies of how human conflicts, climate change, pollution, natural disasters, and looting affect archaeological sites and forecasting of critically-endangered places.

http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/pressrelease/uc_san_diegos_thomas_e._levy_among_recipients_of_presidents_research_cataly http://ccas.ucsd.edu/

Speakers
avatar for Declan Fleming

Declan Fleming

Chief Technology Strategist, University of California San Diego


Tuesday April 4, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Pavilion I-III

10:00am

Building a Deeper Bench: Training Students to Provide Digital Scholarship Support
This program highlights one new way that University of North Carolina Libraries services are enabling pedagogical and curricular change: by training Library student employees to provide substantial digital scholarship support. Historically, the Libraries have helped drive pedagogical change in four ways: 1.) Working directly with instructors on courses, assignments, and in curricular groups, 2.) Partnering with campus support organizations (e.g., teaching & learning center) to deliver programming, 3.) Introducing students to new skills and technologies through direct consultation and instruction, and 4.) Providing and integrating technology-enabled spaces into research and instruction. Recently, we have identified a fifth method: training and mentoring student employees in the delivery of digital scholarship research assistance. Training students to provide significant digital scholarship support gives them a hands-on work experience, engages them in new types of research, and develops their skills with emerging tools and practices. It also allows the Library's many digital scholarship services to scale more readily, providing librarians with more time to engage with researchers on larger, complex projects and questions. In this session, we discuss the kind of work our students engage in, the growth of our training programs, and the curriculum that is beginning to emerge through our experience. We will draw from three examples: o Graduate students in the Science Library's Makerspace providing 3D printing and 3D scanning consultations and instruction to faculty and students. 
 o Graduate students in the Undergraduate Library developing tutorials and teaching workshops on digital media creation, including social media graphics and infographics.
 o Graduate and undergraduate students in the Davis Library Research Hub providing consultations and project support on a range of tools, from Tableau to Python.

 Co-authors, not presenting: 
 Suchi Mohanty, Head, R.B. House Undergraduate Library Amanda Henley, Head, Digital Research Services
 Danianne Mizzy, Head, Kenan Science Information Services

http://library.unc.edu/hub/project-gallery/
http://skillful.web.unc.edu/
http://library.unc.edu/events

Speakers
avatar for Joe M. Williams

Joe M. Williams

Interim Associate University Librarian for Collections and Services, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


Tuesday April 4, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Enchantment C-D

10:00am

Building Distinctive Collections through International Collaborations: Lessons from UCLA's International Digital Ephemera Project
In 2012, the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Library developed the International Digital Ephemera Project and has since embarked on a series of international collection and technology driven collaborations with cultural heritage partners in Africa, the Caribbean, and the Middle East. Through these collaborations the UCLA Library works with its partners to build up their technical infrastructure, expertise and capacity to preserve and provide access to unique documentation that is valuable for the historical record as well as for research and scholarship. These partnerships require that libraries consider alternatives to traditional collecting models based on physical custody and ownership of materials and encourage us to leverage technology for the benefit of each institution involved. This project briefing will discuss the lessons, risks, ethical questions, and opportunities that arise when implementing these partnerships to build unique collections. How can building a global library without walls impact an increasingly multilingual and multicultural campus research community? What are the risks involved in engaging in external partnerships and how is success defined?

http://idep.library.ucla.edu/

Speakers
avatar for Todd Grappone

Todd Grappone

Associate University Librarian for Digital Initiatives and Information Technology, University of California, Los Angeles
avatar for T-Kay Sangwand

T-Kay Sangwand

Librarian for Digital Collection Development, University of California, Los Angeles
T-Kay Sangwand is a Certified Archivist who has worked extensively on preservation partnerships with organizations in US, Latin America, Asia and Africa. She is currently a Librarian at UCLA Digital Library and was previously Archivist for UT Austin's Human Rights Documentation Initiative.


Tuesday April 4, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Fiesta I-II

10:00am

Collaborating to Digitize Paleontological Collections at the University of Wyoming
Academic libraries and museums are increasingly collaborating on digitization, metadata aggregation, and data management to offer access to objects that rarely see the light of day in many small museums. The University of Wyoming Libraries and the UW Geological Museum have been working together to make physical objects (largely vertebrate fossils) available in 3D formats to anyone with an internet connection. Despite an incredible lack of standards and best practices, we have learned not only how to digitize fossil objects (large and small) in 3D, but also how to offer online access to these objects as well as how to archive them for future use.

http://hdl.handle.net/10176/wyu:167616

Speakers
avatar for Chad Hutchens

Chad Hutchens

Head of Digital Collections, University of Wyoming


Tuesday April 4, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Enchantment A-B

10:00am

Digital Preservation in Production: DPN and DuraCloud Vault - Year 1
After a considerable planning and development effort, the Digital Preservation Network (DPN) officially began accepting content submissions in 2016. The journey into production operation required that many hurdles, both technical and administrative, be overcome and that the procedures surrounding long-term distributed digital preservation be defined. This talk will provide an update on some of the critical choices that were made, what content has been submitted to date, and the process needed to make those submissions possible. We will also explore lessons learned by DPN and DuraCloud Vault, one of the DPN nodes, in this first year in production.

http://dpn.org
http://duracloudvault.org

Speakers
avatar for Bill Branan

Bill Branan

Services Technical Director, DuraSpace
DuraCloud,DPN,Hydra-in-a-box, HydraDirect, AWS,DuraSpace,ArchivesDirect,DSpaceDirect
avatar for David Pcolar

David Pcolar

Technical Officer, Digital Preservation Network (DPN)
Dave is the Chief Technology Officer for the Digital Preservation Network. He is responsible for defining technical strategy and development, and implementation of technical and operational services for DPN.


Tuesday April 4, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Fiesta III-IV

10:00am

Exploring Data Management Support Needs of Bioengineering and Biomedical Research Faculty
This study explores biomedical and bioengineering researcher attitudes and practices regarding data management and sharing. Outcomes include a better understanding of researchers' data management practices and knowledge and use of campus data services by National Institutes of Health grantees. Margaret Burnett was a study co-author.

Speakers
CW

Christie Wiley

Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Data Services Librarian, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign


Tuesday April 4, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Enchantment F

10:00am

New Incentive Infrastructure for Sharing Data and Other Research Outputs
We propose a new incentive infrastructure for the sharing of data and other research outputs to change research culture and practices. Three problems exist with the current infrastructure that impedes sharing research outputs. First, the current infrastructure is top-down and requirement focused and has limited incentives for sharing research outputs. Second, research papers and other research outputs are treated as one and the same. Finally, other research outputs match perfectly and in the same authorship order as research papers. In this presentation, we argue that research outputs need to be treated as separate items with separate authorship requirements. This new infrastructure will recognize traditionally neglected labor from junior researchers, facilitate flexible and interdisciplinary collaboration, and promote voluntary sharing of data and other research outputs with higher quality. (Collaborative work with Brett Currier)

Speakers
avatar for Bommae Kim

Bommae Kim

Research Methodologist, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City


Tuesday April 4, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Sendero

10:00am

Open Collections: A Holistic Approach to Digital Collections Discovery and Delivery
Open Collections is a discovery and delivery service developed by University of British Columbia (UBC) Library as an innovative approach to providing access to the Library's managed and curated digital objects. Open Collections was born out of an idea to provide unified indexing, discovery and access to the Library's digital objects, regardless of the repository the objects are managed in. The Library currently utilizes CONTENTdm, DSpace, AtoM and Dataverse for managing its digital objects. Rather than embarking on a project to consolidate repositories to a new framework like Hydra or Islandora, the Library chose to develop a service that improves discovery and delivery of both metadata and the digital objects to researchers and the general public. This presentation will cover the genesis of Open Collections, the development of the aggregated metadata model and unified Elasticsearch index, the suite of discovery and delivery services via the Open Collections API, and the next steps for Open Collections and UBC Library.

https://open.library.ubc.ca

Speakers
avatar for Paul Joseph

Paul Joseph

Systems Librarian, UBC Library
BS

Bronwen Sprout

Head, Digital Programs and Services, University of British Columbia


Tuesday April 4, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Enchantment E

10:30am

Break
Tuesday April 4, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Pavilion Court

11:00am

Developing Library Technology Infrastructure: Two Perspectives
"Building Digital Preservation Infrastructure: Partners, Tools and Services" (Comerford et al)

Over the past year the University of New Mexico (UNM) Libraries instituted a new digital preservation initiative that was literally built from the ground up. Initially conceived as a means to preserve the libraries' digital collections, the project involved developing program structure, improving tools and working with vendors. As the project developed, the digital preservation needs of a broader community than originally planned became vividly apparent, and it evolved into a much larger endeavor that includes preservation of research data, university archives and digital cultural heritage collections from partner institutions around the state. The presenters will discuss their experiences implementing digital preservation at UNM, and talk about how the initiative is starting to encompass the preservation needs of partner organizations.

"XCDAS: The Evolution of a Standards-Based Library Repository System at Dartmouth" (Helm)


The Dartmouth College Library has been working with digital objects in its collections for several years and currently maintains a variety of vended, open source, and locally developed solutions to manage and deliver these objects to the local and global online research community. In 2011, following the creation of "The Dartmouth Digital Library Program Plan" and with work underway on the National Endowment for the Humanities-funded project to create a Scholarly Digital Edition of the papers of Samson Occom, the Library began to coalesce its development strategy around a stack of predominantly open source software already being used to manage XML documents since the early 2000s, rather than to pursue the emerging Hydra technology stack. The result is XCDAS (XML Collections and Digital Archive Storage), an ever-evolving set of tools to manage TEI text collections, e-books, maps, posters, and manuscripts. The current system is managing over 200,000 bagged objects, over 200,000 derivative files, and 1500 XML documents. This presentation gives an overview of the technical infrastructure and of the system itself, which includes tools for working with master file packages, generating derivative files, performing archive validation and consistency checking, converting simplified markup to TEI, and for publishing web sites via XSL transformations.

http://library.unm.edu/services/disc.php 

Speakers
avatar for Karl Benedict

Karl Benedict

Director of Research Data Services, University of New Mexico
For nearly 30 years Karl Benedict has had parallel careers in Information Technology, Data Management and Analysis, and Archaeology. Over the last 22 years at UNM he has worked as a Graduate Student in Anthropology, Research Scientist, Applied Research Center Director, and currently serves as a member of the University Library's faculty as Director of their newly formed Research Data Services program. He has a long standing interest in solving... Read More →
avatar for Kevin Comerford

Kevin Comerford

Director of Digital Initiatives and Scholarly Communication, University of New Mexico
avatar for Anthony Helm

Anthony Helm

Head of Digital Media and Library Technologies, Dartmouth College
AG

Antonio Guillermo Martínez

Founder and CEO, Libnova


Tuesday April 4, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Enchantment E

11:00am

Institutional Repository Strategies: What We Learned at the Executive Roundtables
The Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) held two sessions of the Executive Roundtable “Rethinking Institutional Repository Strategies” just prior to the start of this membership meeting. There was high demand for participation in these events, so while we will produce a written summary, this session is intended to summarize and to some extent synthesize what we heard and what we learned. I’ll review the questions that framed the Roundtable and the major themes that surfaced.

The focus of the Roundtable was to share strategies, policies, experiences, and perspectives on institutional and consortial activities in this area. Some potential topics on the table included the evolution of thinking about the purpose and objectives of different IRs, assessing IRs, uptake of repositories by various sectors of institutional populations, barriers to success, use of cloud services/platforms for IRs, and interfacing with SHARE, CHORUS, and disciplinary and funder repositories.

Speakers
avatar for Clifford Lynch

Clifford Lynch

Executive Director, Coalition for Networked Information
Clifford Lynch has led the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI) since 1997. Prior to joining CNI, Lynch spent 18 years at the University of California Office of the President, the last 10 as Director of Library Automation. Lynch, who holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley, is an adjunct professor at Berkeley’s School of Information. He is both a past president and recipient of the Award of Merit... Read More →


Tuesday April 4, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Enchantment C-D

11:00am

Perma.cc: Ensuring the Integrity of the Digital Scholarly Record

Citation to persistent sources is fundamental to all academic work. Libraries have traditionally collected, organized and preserved those cited sources. Citations today, however, increasingly refer to web pages, not just print sources. Because web pages change their content and disappear all the time, citations to them are ineffective at best and, at times, misleading. This problem, known as "link rot" or "reference rot," means that much of our citation-dependent scholarship is being written on sand. Perma.cc is one solution to combat link rot. Unlike other web archiving services, such as ArchiveIt, Perma.cc relies on the creator of the work to do the archiving at the time of citation. Authors take snapshots of web pages they cite and deposit them in the Perma.cc service. Once deposited, Perma.cc assigns the web page a unique Perma URL (e.g. https://perma.cc/F37P-2E4V) that authors can add to the original URL in their citations. Should the original link later rot or be changed, readers can follow the Perma.cc URL to view the original source. Perma.cc was originally developed for use by the legal community but has received a National Digital Platform grant from the Institute for Museum and Library Services to broaden its use beyond the legal community. The service is now free to all colleges and universities. Libraries serve as the registrars for the Perma.cc service and provide support for their institutions' users. This presentation will provide an overview of the service, the role the library plays, and instructions for signing up.

 

http://perma.cc

Speakers
avatar for Adam Ziegler

Adam Ziegler

Managing Director, Harvard Library Innovation Lab, Harvard University
Adam Ziegler is an attorney and member of the Library Innovation Lab at Harvard Law School where he leads technology projects like Free the Law, Perma.cc and H2O. Before taking that role, he co-founded a legal tech startup named Mootus and represented clients for over a decade at Covington & Burling, Goodwin Procter LLP and Donnelly, Conroy & Gelhaar LLP, where he was a litigation partner.


Tuesday April 4, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Enchantment F

11:00am

Semantic Web Identity: A New Opportunity for Libraries to Improve Machine Comprehension of Academic Organizations and Concepts
Internet search engines have difficulty understanding academic organizations due to a lack of structured data records on the Semantic Web. This poor understanding impedes the ability of search engines to refer users to the organizations and limits the information search engines can hand to semantic technologies, such as mapping and voice-activated applications. Semantic Web Identity (SWI) is the condition in which search engines understand the existence and nature of entities. The display of a Knowledge Graph Card in Google search results is an indicator of SWI, as it demonstrates that the search engine has gathered verifiable facts about the entity. SWI may positively impact the award of research funding, student enrollment, faculty recruitment, and even university rankings. This presentation summarizes research conducted for a recent doctoral dissertation, showing that SWI is poor for Association of Research Libraries (ARL) libraries and that this condition extends to many other academic organizations. The situation presents a bold new opportunity for academic libraries, and this presentation will also provide a case study of Montana State University Library’s success in offering SWI services to campus organizations.

Dissertation: http://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/12517
Data set: http://doi.org/10.15788/M2F590
Semantic Web Identity Services at Montana State University: https://www.lib.montana.edu/services/semantic-web/ 

Speakers
avatar for Kenning Arlitsch

Kenning Arlitsch

Dean of the Library, Montana State University
JS

Justin Shanks

Semantic Web Identity Researcher, Montana State University


Tuesday April 4, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Sendero

11:00am

Software Carpentry in the Library: Partnering to Give Researchers Needed Technical Skills
Basic programming and data management skills have become invaluable for creating reproducible research; however, this training is rarely included in graduate curriculum. Major grant-funded projects may be able to hire someone to provide these services, but the majority cannot. Recognizing this need, the University of Oklahoma Libraries has partnered with Software Carpentry, a non-profit foundation that offers two-day, hands-on workshops on basic programming skills designed to help researchers automate and track their research processes. The University Libraries has offered 12 local workshops since 2014 with over 300 faculty, graduate students, and staff from over 30 departments and research groups participating. We offer the workshops multiple times each semester -- one before the semester starts, one during the middle of the semester, and one at the end of the semester. We have found that offering the mid-semester workshop during the week of Thanksgiving or Spring Break increases attendance since participants are more likely to be able to have two full days available. Each workshop is taught by library staff including experts in data management, informatics, and digital scholarship. By having library staff teach and attend the workshops, our team has gained a better understanding of our local researchers’ needs. The sessions also allow researchers to connect and develop relationships with specialists in the library, who can guide them through more advanced data and programming issues. Developing these relationships has helped to position the University Libraries as a nucleus for research on campus. During this briefing, attendees will learn best practices that have resulted from our experiences in planning and implementing such a program.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Clayton

Sarah Clayton

Digital Scholarship Specialist, University of Oklahoma
Sarah Clayton joined OU Libraries in July 2015. She earned her M.S. in Information from the University of Michigan in 2015 and a B.A. in History from Emory University in 2013. At OU, Sarah supports faculty and students pursing digital projects by teaching workshops on digital tools, providing consultation services for individual projects, and evaluating new technologies. She has been a certified Software Carpentry instructor since 2015.
avatar for Carl Grant

Carl Grant

Associate Dean, Knowledge Services & Chief Technology Officer, University of Oklahoma
Carl Grant is the Associate Dean for Knowledge Services and Chief Technology Officer at the University of Oklahoma Libraries. Carl has an extensive background in the information industry and has worked for many years in the corporate enterprise that supports library services in leadership positions at Ex Libris, VTLS, Ameritech Library Services, and Innovative Interfaces.


Tuesday April 4, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Enchantment A-B

11:00am

Successful Open Educational Resources Initiatives: The Winning Formula
This presentation will highlight the most effective strategies to encourage faculty to adopt OER (open educational resources) while protecting academic freedom, how to write an effective plan to increase OER use, and what key benefits to students and faculty to focus on while discussing OER with your administrators, faculty and students. The session will also include discussion of the journey of Rice University's successful OER project, OpenStax, and especially the lessons Rice University learned along the way that are applicable to any college or university developing an OER initiative.

www.openstax.org
www.cnx.org 

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Finkbeiner

Nicole Finkbeiner

Associate Director, Institutional Relations, Rice University
Nicole is the Associate Director of Institutional Relations, focused on developing and managing the relationships with faculty adopters and administrators. A graduate of Kellogg Community College, Western Michigan University and Michigan State University, she worked in college relations for community colleges prior to joining OpenStax College. When not promoting Open Education Resources, Nicole fills her time attending lectures, spending time... Read More →


Tuesday April 4, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Fiesta III-IV

11:00am

Supporting Scholarly Research Practices at Scale in the Humanities: A Deep Dive into Faculty Research Practices in Art History, History and Religious Studies
Substantial evidence from many sources shows that digital innovation has led to changing research practices among some humanities faculty, necessitating the creation of new forms of expert consultation and training in technologies. But, which of these needs for new services among early adopters are becoming the needs of the faculty-at-large? In this presentation we compare findings across three of Ithaka S+R’s large-scale cross-institutional qualitative research projects on scholars in history (2012), art history (2013) and religious studies (2017) focusing on their adoption of new research methods, and their approaches to information discovery and information management. In this presentation, we will examine both disciplinary and shared needs and suggest opportunities for more systematic approaches to delivering the research support needs of humanists. As many institutional programs are still in the early phases of creating programs to support emerging research activities, understanding how the wider humanities field is engaging with digital innovation is crucial to identifying and prioritizing which initiatives should be scaled up, how and by whom.

http://www.sr.ithaka.org/services/research-support/

Speakers
avatar for Danielle Cooper

Danielle Cooper

Senior Researcher, Libraries and Scholarly Communication Program, Ithaka S+R
Danielle Cooper is an analyst at Ithaka S+R in the Libraries and Scholarly Communication program, where she utilizes her combined expertise as a professional librarian and library ethnographer towards helping organizations understand and improve their information-based spaces and services. As part of her work she coordinates the Research Support Services program, which develops large-scale collaborative projects with academic libraries to... Read More →
avatar for Roger C. Schonfeld

Roger C. Schonfeld

Director, Library and Scholarly Communications, Ithaka S+R
Roger is program director at Ithaka S+R. There, he leads strategic consulting, surveys, and other research projects, designed for academic libraries, publishers, and scholarly societies. Recently, Roger has led the development of Ithaka S+R’s surveys for individual colleges and universities, to help them better serve the needs of their own faculty members and students. He has also led research and consulting projects on collections... Read More →


Tuesday April 4, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Fiesta I-II

11:00am

The Role of Academic Libraries in an Era of Fake News, Alternative Facts, and Information Overload
Recent news reports of large segments of the population falling for fake news stories came as no surprise to academic librarians who have spent years watching students struggle with the challenges of discovering, internalizing, evaluating, and applying credible information. After all, making sense of information has always been hard, and people today are confronted with the most complex and crowded information landscape in human history. This hot-button presentation focuses on what the role of academic libraries should be in helping individuals make sense of a world bursting at the seams with information—some of it completely unreliable. Reflecting on our history of promoting information literacy, librarians and other information professionals need to ask ourselves which instructional approaches we should keep, which we need to change, and how we might use technology to improve our success in helping students become information-literate scholars and citizens.

https://theconversation.com/the-challenge-facing-libraries-in-an-era-of-fake-news-70828 http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/ilframework 

Speakers
DA

Donald A. Barclay

Deputy University Librarian, University of California, Merced


Tuesday April 4, 2017 11:00am - 12:00pm
Pavilion I-III

12:00pm

Lunch
Tuesday April 4, 2017 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Pavilion IV-VI

1:00pm

Protect Researcher Privacy in the Surveillance Era

With the combination of Wireless, Proxy, and ILS data, libraries today have a 360 degree, highly granular view of researcher activity. These data are valuable for operational decisions, however they have immense privacy implications. We will examine these data, their beneficial uses, and the necessary steps needed to protect researchers.

This presentation will be most relevant for libraries with: centralized wireless; centralized authentication; e.g. CAS, LDAP, Shibboleth; EZProxy or other web proxy to electronic resources, and designated patron type (faculty, undergraduate, etc.) information either in the ILS or in the CAS/LDAP/Shibboleth.


Speakers
SK

Sam Kome

Director of Strategic Initiatives & Information Technology, Claremont Colleges


Tuesday April 4, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Enchantment A-B

1:00pm

Social Networks and Archival Context: In Transition from Project to Program
Social Networks and Archival Context (SNAC) began as a research and development project in 2010, and in 2015 began to transition to an ongoing cooperative program. This project update will focus on the technological and social changes required to make the transition successful. The transition has required that the underlying technology platform be completely transformed, transitioning from the aggregation of data from multiple sources using a multi-step batch process to a platform supporting both batch ingest of new data and ongoing human curation of the data. Given that the data will be cooperatively maintained to benefit the members and end-users, a major focus of the social transition has been on governance: editorial policy and standards; technology requirements; communication; and training. The project update will focus on the current status of the transition and future plans for continuing and completing the transition. SNAC has received funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

http://socialarchive.iath.virginia.edu/

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Pitti

Daniel Pitti

Principal Investigator, Social Networks and Archival Context (SNAC), Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities, University of Virginia
Daniel Pitti is the Associate Director of the Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities. He is Director of Social Networks and Archival Context, a project initiated in 2010. He is the chair of the International Council on Archives (ICA) Expert Group on Archival Description, a group currently revising the ICA description standards. Over the years, he has been involved in the development of EAD and EAC-CPF.
JS

Jerry Simmons

External Agency Liaison to SNAC, U.S. National Archives and Records Administration
I'm working as NARA's link to SNAC (Social Networks and Archival Context), working with other SNAC partners to stand up this new data cooperative. I'm all about linking creators of archival materials together in context, and linking them all to their original archival collections.


Tuesday April 4, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Enchantment F

1:00pm

Solving Scholarly Publishing Problems by Building Upon Institutional Repositories: Two Case Studies Based on the Digital Commons and Islandora Platforms

"Building an Islandora Data Repository Using an External DDN Storage Infrastructure" (Hutchens) 

The University of Wyoming Libraries have partnered with UW's Advanced Research Computing Center (ARCC) to provide a campus research data repository. Coupling the Libraries' experience with Islandora and Fedora along with ARCC's expertise in high performance computing and storage, we successfully launched the UW Data Repository in September 2016. We now offer all campus researchers single sign-on authentication for dataset and metadata submission, simultaneous DOI assignment and DataCite metadata deposit via the EZID API, as well as unlimited file size storage capacity (something not achievable using Islandora version 7 alone). Using an "endowment" business model to fund storage costs, we have made this service free to all campus users who wish to share their data. Like all solutions, we've encountered numerous problems along the way, our implementation has its drawbacks, and we certainly have more work to do.

 

"Leveraging IR Collections as Distributed Service Layers" (Benedict, Wheeler)

Consideration of the research impact and organizational value of institutional repositories (IR) highlights the utility of defining and evolving innovative IR service models. As a particular example, the integration of OAI-PMH utilities and custom application programming interfaces (API) within widely adopted IR platforms including Digital Commons and DSpace enable repository managers to develop and promote unique services around IR as content stores for external research systems. In this project briefing, librarians from the University of New Mexico will describe the development of a spatially enabled discovery service that interacts dynamically with a Digital Commons-hosted collection of documents pertaining to Native American Water Rights Settlements (NAWRS). By extending Digital Commons' OAI-PMH metadata schema to incorporate point and polygon representations of the areas referenced within NAWRS documents, librarians were able to build transparent, dynamic linkages between the IR and the externally hosted spatial discovery portal. The resulting service adds value to both endpoints. This project briefing will include a description of the metadata enrichment and OAI-PMH harvest workflows, together with an overview of how the harvested metadata and documents are incorporated within the discovery portal architecture to best leverage the complementary capabilities of Elasticsearch, AngularJS, and the OpenLayers web mapping framework.

 

http://data.uwyo.edu



Speakers
avatar for Karl Benedict

Karl Benedict

Director of Research Data Services, University of New Mexico
For nearly 30 years Karl Benedict has had parallel careers in Information Technology, Data Management and Analysis, and Archaeology. Over the last 22 years at UNM he has worked as a Graduate Student in Anthropology, Research Scientist, Applied Research Center Director, and currently serves as a member of the University Library's faculty as Director of their newly formed Research Data Services program. He has a long standing interest in solving... Read More →
avatar for Chad Hutchens

Chad Hutchens

Head of Digital Collections, University of Wyoming
JW

Jonathan Wheeler

Data Curation Librarian, University of New Mexico


Tuesday April 4, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Enchantment E

1:00pm

Sustainability of Community-owned Repository Software: A Call to Action

Sustainability of open-source software is a continual challenge in the relatively small world of cultural heritage institutions. The challenge is amplified due to the critical preservation implications tied to institutional commitments; cultural heritage institutions are expected to preserve and provide access to repository-held data into the foreseeable future, and yet our models for shared software governance are relatively immature, and commitments to software sustainability ebb and flow over time. The cultural, financial, and philosophical dimensions of the community surrounding the software play as much, if not more, of a role in a project's sustainability as the technology itself. With a collective thirty years of experience grappling with these challenges, the speakers will offer varied perspectives on approaches to ensuring the software that supports the long-term preservation and accessibility of our digital heritage will still exist tomorrow. This session will dive deeper into the specific challenges faced by a few open-source repository software communities, outlining what the Islandora, Hydra, and Fedora communities have done to address sustainability in their projects, past and present, and how well these measures have succeeded. Specific tactics for engaging in these projects will be offered as a call to action.


Speakers
MG

Michael Giarlo

Technical Manager, Hydra-in-a-Box, Stanford University
avatar for Nick Ruest

Nick Ruest

Digital Assets Librarian, York University
avatar for Andrew Woods

Andrew Woods

Technical Lead, Fedora, Duraspace


Tuesday April 4, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Fiesta III-IV

1:00pm

Task Force on Technical Approaches to Email Archives: Update and Discussion

The Task Force on Technical Approaches to Email, formed in September 2016 and sponsored by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Digital Preservation Coalition, is charged with (a) reexamining and assessing current efforts to preserve email; (b) articulating a conceptual and technical framework in which these efforts can operate not as competing solutions, but as elements of an interoperable toolkit to be applied as needed; and (c) constructing a working agenda for the community to refine this technical framework, adjust existing tools to work within this framework, and begin to fill in missing elements. The Task Force will prepare a report of its findings. The report will include recommendations concerning the specific actions that those interested in email archiving can take to demonstrate within 2-5 years that archives can safely accession and preserve records of human expression in the form of email. In this project briefing, Task Force co-chairs Chris Prom and Kate Murray will report on the Task Force's work to date and will solicit feedback and input. This input is critical in helping Task Force members shape the final report and recommendations, which will be issued in late 2017.

 

http://www.emailarchivestaskforce.org/

Speakers
avatar for Kate Murray

Kate Murray

Information Technology Specialist, Digital Collections & Management Services, Library of Congress
Kate Murray is the IT Specialist (Audio-Visual Specialist) in the Technology Policy Directorate at the Library of Congress. At the Library of Congress, Kate leads the Federal Agencies Digital Guidelines Initiative (FADGI) Audio-Visual Working Group and coauthors the Sustainability of Digital Formats website. She is the co-chair of the Mellon Foundation’s Task Force on Technical Approaches to Email Archives and a coordinator of the 2015... Read More →
avatar for Chris Prom

Chris Prom

Archivist and Andrew S.G. Turyn Professor, University Archives, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Chris is Assistant Archivist at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign and has served the Society in numerous capacities and is currently Publications Editor. Having recently received 400 GB of photographs from the College of Agriculture, Consumer and Environmental Sciences, Chris is collaborating with the photographer to leverage embedded metadata and provide access via open source digital image management software in a custom-built... Read More →


Tuesday April 4, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Enchantment C-D

1:00pm

The Continuing Evolution of Library High Technology Collaborative Spaces: Infocommons, Digital Scholarship Centers, Makerspaces, and More

High technology collaborative spaces in academic libraries have evolved in a variety of interesting ways over the past two decades. In this session, we will explore developments in facilities termed information or learning commons, digital scholarship centers, makerspaces, media studios, and others. We will review the results of a recent survey on information commons and an associated trends monograph under development. We will explore variations in implementation of newly configured and technology-enabled library spaces, and present our views of the successes and perceived missed opportunities of such facilities as they have developed over the past two decades. The presenters will invite observations from the audience regarding these trends. 

http://www.projectinfolit.org/joan-lippincott-smart-talk.html


Speakers
MH

Martin Halbert

Dean of Libraries, University of North Texas
avatar for Joan K. Lippincott

Joan K. Lippincott

Associate Executive Director, Coalition for Networked Information
Joan K. Lippincott is the Associate Executive Director of the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI), a joint program of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and EDUCAUSE. At CNI, Joan has provided leadership for programs in teaching and learning, assessment, learning spaces, and collaboration among professional groups. She is a widely published author and frequent conference speaker. She is chair of the Association of... Read More →
EM

Elizabeth Milewicz

Head, Digital Scholarship Services Department, Duke University


Tuesday April 4, 2017 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Fiesta I-II

2:00pm

Break
Tuesday April 4, 2017 2:00pm - 2:15pm
Pavilion Court

2:15pm

Closing Plenary: Fresh Perspectives on the Future of University-Based Publishing

Academic libraries are taking on more active roles in support of research dissemination. Does a diminished role for university presses necessarily follow? It does not. I’ll discuss the distinctive and increasingly urgent functions of the university press, and the challenge of balancing the imperatives of sustainability and openness. How do we meet the differing requirements of professional, text, and trade authors? How do we fulfill our mission to make our publications available, discoverable, and searchable in digital form now, and in perpetuity? I will also cover strategies to promote productive partnerships, and the significant benefits of closer coordination among presses, libraries, and the academic departments within their institutions.



Speakers
avatar for Amy Brand

Amy Brand

Director, The MIT Press
Amy Brand was named Director of the MIT Press in July 2015. Previously, she served as VP Academic and Research Relations and VP North America at Digital Science. From 2008 to 2013, Brand worked at Harvard University, first as Program Manager of the Office for Scholarly Communication and then as Assistant Provost for Faculty Appointments and Information. Before moving to Harvard, she held long-term positions as an Executive Editor at the MIT Press... Read More →


Tuesday April 4, 2017 2:15pm - 3:30pm
Pavilion I-III