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Representatives from CNI member organizations gather twice annually to explore new technologies, content, and applications; to further collaboration; to analyze technology policy issues; and to catalyze the development and deployment of new projects. Each member organization may send two representatives. Visit https://www.cni.org/mm/spring-2017 for more information.
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Monday, April 3 • 5:30pm - 6:00pm
Data Integrity for Librarians, Archivists, and Criminals: What We Can Steal from Bitcoin, BitTorrent, and Usenet

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Data integrity is important in distributed systems. The same characteristics that make these systems robust (e.g., fault tolerance) make maintaining data integrity challenging. For this reason, hash functions play a central role in the algorithms and technologies that power Usenet, BitTorrent, and Bitcoin and its blockchain. A hash function is a function that maps arbitrarily sized data to some ideally smaller, unique, and non-invertable data of fixed size (the importance of these attributes will be explained). The MD5 hash of the title of this presentation is 23c1d6085d85ae07378da9861e792c34; if the Oxford commas were removed, the hash would change to 6eed93a3b7dc829f38065518b346ee72. If you were given both the title and its hash, then you could compute the hash of the title you received yourself and compare it to that of the hash you received. If they differed, you would know that there was an error in transmission or that an intermediate editor rejects clarity and civility. This presentation will introduce hashes and their variants, these distributed and sometimes dubious systems, and what can be learned and practically applied in today's digital repositories for purposes of auditing, identifying, recovering, and sharing data.

Speakers
avatar for Jeffrey Spies

Jeffrey Spies

Chief Technology Officer, Center for Open Science
Jeffrey Spies is the co-founder and Chief Technology Officer of the Center for Open Science (COS; http://cos.io), a non-profit technology company missioned to increase openness, integrity, and reproducibility of scientific research. Jeff is also the co-lead of SHARE (http://share-research.org)--an initiative by the Association of Research Libraries, the Association of American Universities, the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities... Read More →


Monday April 3, 2017 5:30pm - 6:00pm
Pavilion I-III